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Hoardings

View of building hoarding at Battersea Power Station with the words WE LIVE HERE, overlaid with the book title - Hoardings Plain page with the word Hoardings Plain page with the following text - In our time all politics is about real estate; and this from the loftiest statecraft to the most petty manoeuvring around local advantage. Postmodern politics is essentially a matter of land grabs, on a local as well as global scale.<br />
Fredric Jameson, The Aesthetics of Singularity A hoarding shows a photographic image of an apparently privileged young boy peeping through a circular hole A hoarding shows a large outdoor dinner party with middle class white people Two middle class young people discussing something in an office A hoarding is illustrated with white people discussing something against a sunset, behind the hoarding Battersea Power Station can be seen A large yellow hoarding over a pavement, a tree can be seen inside a small hole in a hoarding allows a tree to grow through a full to the brim outdoor ashtray stands in front of a bright red and blue hoarding ivy grows around an architectcts impression of a new development two photographs of a blue hoarding from different angles, one says Forged from the enduring spirit of London, the other says fo Ballymore two photographs of hoardings in different locations, one says support the supporters and embrace digital, the other says embrace the new a hoarding below scaffolding says A building for the next generation a hoarding which says Soon a yellow hoarding on which a sign says Sometimes not thinking about business is good for business a street view with a hoarding on which the words Our Place are visible two views of a hoarding, wealthy young people are illustrated in black and white images, the words say We are Embassy Gardens two photos of different hoardings around Battersea Power Station with pedestrians passing a close-up of a pink hoarding in the rain, the text says Super Space - Students from BA Graphic Design and BA Illustration and Animation at London Metropolitan University have designed these hoardings. The starting point is the locality - its culture, history, social and commercial use, and how the community connect with those aspects of this site, Central House on Whitechapel High Street a black hoarding which says Creativity has always been at the heart of Norton Folgate brightly coloured hoarding which says Go with the flow. We were not born to stand still, those that do will always ache for places they'll never visit Another view of the same brightly colour hoarding which says Everyone is different; we all have our mountain to climb. The dizzy heights that leave people breathless can also, for some, exist at its base two photographs of hoardings with red and white barriers, one hoarding has a photo of a luxurious interior, the other the future exterior of a building a hoarding shows a planned square with people in a new development, beyond the hoarding lies a chaotic building site a hoarding shows a computer generated view of people at leisure in front of a rock pool with tall buildings rising behind; meanwhile in real life a runner and car pass in front and a grey sky looms behind a long hoarding shows an artistic photo collage of blurred figures playing musical instruments alongside the Thames; in real life cars and people pass by in front a hoardijng displays a perfectly made bed wiht orange pillows and a cup of coffee on a tray; behind in real life partially built tall buildings rise into the sky a hoarding shows four slender women in differently coloured evening gowns in a country house-style garden two photos show computer generated visions of a station concourse, one image shows the figures in ghostly, semi-transparent form two photos show close-ups of hoardings where female women of colour are obscured by white posts a hoarding shows children's drawings of construction equipment, the material is torn and peeling away' a blue hoarding show an architects impression of a new Lidl supermarket, next to the picture is a weathered and indecipherable website address a photograph in eight sections of a brick archway has been pasted onto a black hoarding, rain has caused the pieces to begin to peel away someone has written Mingo on one of the trainers on a photo of a smartly dressed pair of walking legs which adorns a hoarding an architectural mockup provides a view over the Thames and part of London, someone has spray canned STEZ! over it a blue hoarding with a circular poster on which there is a hand with an eye and a hand without one joined by two circular arrows, below this are the words - am I dreaming? two photos of an architectural mockup of a planned building with part of the image ripped away, someone has written in felt tip pen - The Canterbury Where has it gone? Cunts!


Dimensions: w: 25cm, h: 32cm
Book: 2021


In our time all politics is about real estate; and this from the loftiest statecraft to the most petty manoeuvring around local advantage. Postmodern politics is essentially a matter of land grabs, on a local as well as global scale.
Fredric Jameson, The Aesthetics of Singularity


Hoard

Noun

A stock or store of money or valued objects, typically one that is secret or carefully guarded: he came back to rescue his little hoard of gold.
An ancient store of coins or other valuable artefacts: a hoard of Romano-British bronzes.
An amassed store of useful information, retained for future use: a hoard of secret information about his work.

Hoarding

Noun

A large board in a public place, used to display advertisements.
A temporary board fence erected round a building site.


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